Truro Pamet River Inspires Second “Remaining in Provincetown” Mystery Series

Antique Postcard , color lithographic print, mailed with a two cent stamp.

Antique Postcard , color lithographic print, mailed with a two cent stamp.

At the time this postcard was printed and mailed, there was still a train that traveled the length of Cape Cod, all the way to Provincetown.  While Provincetown quickly became a bustling and densely populated settlement, Truro has remained primarily rural.  One of its fine features are the expansive sand dunes, marshes, and the Pamet River, shown in the above postcard.

As the sequel to the mystery novel, Remaining in Provincetown” opens, Len Milbury is going for a run from the Truro Town Center Post Office to Ballston Beach on the road that runs parallel to The Pamet River.  In his backpack he carries a letter.  Is it a clue?

While the book’s title has not been finalized,  there is another book that follows “Remaining in Provincetown”.  In it you”ll get a chance to read more about the the lives and adventures of Frank Chambers and Roz Silva. But maybe you haven’t read the first book yet in which case, please do.  A new batch of autographed copies are about to arrive at The Provincetown Bookstore at 246 Commercial Street. And if you aren’t going to be in Provincetown, then you can always order the book online as a trade paperback or ebook. 

Remaining in Provincetown  By S.N.Cook.  Truro Works. 306 pages  $12.95 Trade Paperback

Remaining in Provincetown
By S.N.Cook.
Truro Works. 306 pages
$12.95 Trade Paperback

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Provincetown Inn mystery of the house on the hill

West End, Provincetown Cape Cod Massachussets first Murchison house

West End, Provincetown Cape Cod Massachusetts first Murchison house

Today a contemporary mansion, once the residence of  the famous psychologist Carl Murchison, sits high up looking out across Land’s End, hidden by an overgrown thicket of shrubs and trees across the street from the Provincetown Inn. But 100 years ago, as shown in the above picture postcard, a white Victorian style house sat on an open bluff and the Provincetown Inn was yet to be constructed. (They opened their doors in 1925).

Cranberry bogs and wetlands once were more apparent in this scenic spot on the very tip of Cape Cod and an open white fence created a boundary for the flower bed and green fields beyond. Sidewalks were made of wood.

So who was Carl Murchison and his wife Dorotea who built the current glass walled house that sits on the hill today?… The Murchisons moved to Provincetown in the mid 1930s from Worcester, Massachusetts where Carl was previously editor and publisher of the Clark University Press.  Chair of the psychology department at Clark University he edited over a dozen books which brought international recognition to the University but also created some controversy within some scientific circles as to his research practices and management of the psychology department.  In 1935 he founded the Journal of Psychology, which he published out of his own home. This newest enterprise created the ultimate clash leading to his exit from the University.  He did, however retain possession of all the Clark University Press journals he edited and he continued to publish his journals out of Provincetown.  A tragic fire in the spring of 1956 destroyed the original house, including many of his private papers. A new modern house designed by Walter Gropius’s firm, costing $300,000 (a princely sum at the time) replaced the earlier home but unfortunately Carl did not live very much longer to enjoy its beauty. ( It was named on of the best-designed homes at 1959 by Architectural Record magazine. )He died in 1961, after an 18 month illness, (For more details about Murchison’s life consult Portraits of Pioneers in Psychology, vol 2, edited by Kimble, Boneau & Wertheimer, and published by the American Psychological Association, 1996.) His wife lived in the house for another 20 years. If you like mysteries and you like Provincetown, you’ll want to read  the new novel Remaining in Provincetown, just released this month and available for sale at Amazon in trade paperback or kindle. Like our Facebook page and you may be selected to receive a FREE book.

Provincetown Harbor Prettiest on Cape Cod

A view of Provincetown, Massachusetts harbor from Town Hill.

A view of Provincetown, Massachusetts harbor from Town Hill.

An antique postcard from the time when it only cost one penny to mail, this color lithographic print captures the beauty of Provincetown on the tip of Cape Cod when the harbor was filled with sailing ships. The description on the back says it all: PROVINCETOWN is one of the quaintest places, not only on the Cape, but in the entire country with its old streets, very narrow at that, and fairly teems with “local color” which attracts scores of artists every year eager to transfer the odd scenes to canvas. It is entirely unlike any other town in the country and must be seen to be fully appreciated. Writers are also artists, and the town is certainly the inspiration for the just released murder mystery Remaining in Provincetown now available at Amazon.com  and on Kindle. Like the RemaininginProvincetown Facebook page and you may be selected to win a FREE book.

Like our facebook fan page and you may be selected to receive a FREE advance cppy!

Like our facebook fan page and you may be selected to receive a FREE advance cppy!

Provincetown art schools and artists

An Art Class at Work

An Art Class at Work

Artists clustered together on a dock painting a scene of  a Provincetown Wharf in summer. How could they work, all crowded together? The clear north light on the tip of Cape Cod attracted artists from all over the world. Many of these artists were also  teachers. Thus more aspiring artists were drawn to Cape Cod to study drawing and painting and dozens stayed and made Cape Cod their permanent home. Thus Provincetown become known as an art colony. Today the town is home to the Fine Arts Work Center as well, where students of writing, sculpture, painting, and drawing work year-round.

One of the most popular art teachers was Charles Hawthorne (1872-1930) and many of his fine oil paintings are in the collection of the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.  Hawthorne founded the Cape Cod School of Art. Be sure to visit the Provincetown Art Association and Museum if you are a new visitor to the town to see his masterful portraits, still lifes, and landscapes.    Many artists had art schools including Hans Hoffman,  Seong Moy, who taught printmaking, and Henry Henche.  Hawthorne taught his students to focus on capturing the contrasts in colors and light and to work quickly with confidence.  These are still good life lessons that could be applied to everything including writing. Read any good books lately? The new novel, coming this summer Remaining in Provincetown, is almost on its way to the printer.

Announcing a new book set in Provincetown

Remaining in Provincetown is the name of a fabulous novel, about to be published and this blog is the place where you’ll be able to ask your questions and make your comments. Want to know more?

This color lithograph postcard was created over 100 years ago. What's on that corner now?

This color lithograph postcard was created over 100 years ago. What’s on that corner now?

Old postcards figure into the plot.