Corn Hill Cottages in Truro Near Provincetown Book Action

What a great view at sunset, high atop Corn Hill in Truro, you can look down on Cape Cod Bay and the Pamet River.  The site of Corn Hill is famous, because this is the location where a search party from The Mayflower while docked in Provincetown Harbor found the Indian’s winter stash of corn (November 15, 1620). There is a monument marker that tells the story at the base of the hill and at the top of the hill, are what were once the original  Corn Hill Cottages as shown in this postcard, built in 1900.  Originally there were two rows of cottages, but a fire in 1937  destroyed the lower row of cottages and they were never rebuilt. A great deal of modernization as taken place to the entire area with the addition of luxury homes that populate the once rustic area, but look closely if you take a walk in the area and you can get a glimpse of the older architecture.

Not too far from Provincetown, Corn Hill Beach and the Pamet are near some of the action takes place in the sequel to the murder mystery Remaining in Provincetown by S.N. Cook.  Haven’t read the first book yet?  Autographed copies are available at the Provincetown Book Shop on Commercial Street and are also available online in trade paperback and as an ebook.  Like us on Facebook and keep the conversation going.

Like our facebook fan page and you may be selected to receive a FREE advance cppy!

Like our facebook fan page and you may be selected to receive a FREE advance cppy!

Reading some books about Provincetown will get you in the mood for your visit.

Reading some books about Provincetown will get you in the mood for your visit.

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Truro Cape Cod Pamet River

Early 20th century Truro Postcard showing Pamet River.

Early 20th century Truro Postcard showing Pamet River.

If you live in Provincetown, you spend time in Truro–the adjacent township which is more rural in its setting.  Or maybe you work  in Provincetown and live in Truro. One of the beautiful spots in the town is the Pamet River. Over four miles in length, the river is named for the Paomet Indian tribe who lived on Cape Cod. It is probably their corn the pilgrims stole from Corn Hill after  they initially landed in Provincetown Harbor and then went further down the Bay in pursuit of food.
WIth the changes that winter storms have wrought on the coastlines during the past few years, its interesting to see this old postcard that was mailed in 1927 from Truro to Carver Road.   The writer was evidently staying in Truro but talks about going into Provincetown to enjoy parades and celebrations.  So even back in the 1920s, Provincetown was the place for parties.  Want to learn more about Provincetown read Remaining in Provincetown by S.N. Cook, available online and in local bookstores. Like us on Facebook and keep the conversation going. Pick up a copy of this week’s Provincetown Magazine and read a brief excerpt from the book.